Geo-thermal

A major source of energy is right under your feet.

Your own backyard has the potential to be your source of heating and cooling comfort. Now you can get safe, reliable, energy efficient heating and cooling from one piece of equipment. Geothermal energy represents the leading edge of heating and cooling technology. It moves heat energy to and from the earth to heat and cool your indoor environment. And compared to ordinary systems, geothermal technology can save you 30% to 70% on your monthly energy bills. Geothermal is the safest, cleanest, most reliable space conditioning system you can buy.

Geothermal energy is an unlimited resource. The lot surrounding a suburban home or other building contains a vast reservoir of low temperature thermal energy, typically 10 times that required over an entire heating season. This resource is constantly resupplied by the sun, the surrounding earth, and heat rejected while cooling during the summer. The universal definition of geothermal is “…pertaining to the heat of the earth.” By using the earth to provide 100% of a building’s total heating and cooling needs, GHP systems are truly geothermal energy made practical.

Geothermal heat pump systems are not do-it-yourself projects. To ensure properĀ results, the piping should be installed by professionals who follow procedures established by the International Ground Source Heat Pump Association (IGSHPA). Designing the system also calls for professional expertise: the length of the loop depends upon a number of factors, including the type of loop configuration used; your home’s heating and air conditioning load; local soil conditions and landscaping; and the severity of your climate. Larger homes requiring more heating or air conditioning generally need larger loops than smaller homes. Homes in climates where temperatures are extreme also generally require larger loops.

To date, geothermal heat pumps are an under-used technology, merely because few people are aware of it’s potential. The Department of Energy’s Office of Geothermal Technologies, however, wants to increase installations of geothermal systems to about 400,000 a year by 2005. If the goal is reached, that would mean that 2 million systems would be in service, saving consumers over $400 million per year in energy bills and reducing U.S. greenhouse gas emissions by over 1 million metric tons of carbon each year.